UAB

The design process of an open, collaborative and innovation lab is not just a methodological issue. On the contrary, the design process in itself can set a relevant precedent for future collaborative practices in the lab. The stakeholders that will be involved, the kind of relationships established among them, or the topics opened to public debate may have an impact on how the labs will function in the future. In the following article, we expose how the design process of UAB Open Labs, that took place from January to December 2018, was carried out.

Multi-stakeholder participative approach

The UAB Open Labs follow the trail of predecessor innovation spaces/labs such as makerspaces / fab labs and living labs and adopts their main aim: providing an open space for designing, prototyping and testing collaboratively. Therefore, participation and collaboration lay in the core of the UAB Open Labs fundamental principles. Precisely for that reason the design process of the UAB Open Labs was conceived and carried out in line with these principles, deploying a multi-stakeholder participatory approach and by implicating the final user in the design from the early beginning of the process. As described in a previous article, since 2013 the UAB had already setup four thematic strategic research communities (COREs) that had activated and engaged a great part of the academic community and thus could serve as the base for the co-creation process. The existence of these communities provided two identifiable advantages: i) a recognition and identification of needs and capacities of faculties and research groups based on the functioning of the COREs the previous years ii) an acquainted community that could be invited, engaged and make participant in this new endeavour that they would ultimately be the beneficiaries of.

A third factor to take into consideration was the existence of the UAB Smart Campus Living Lab (member of EnoLL since 2014) that had been functioning for some years already on an experimental basis. The creation of the Open Labs was ideated precisely as a pragmatic step for the further development of the Smart Campus Living Lab, where they  the Open Labs would serve as the operating branch of the Campus Living Lab, reinforcing its stature and capacities, and increasing its potential impact as an innovation and technology transfer tool while at the same time helping to impulse even further the collaboration potential within the COREs and the university community as a whole.


The first step in any participatory process is answering who should be invited to participate. In this regard, it should be noted that UAB Open Labs have some relevant differences with other labs that should be taken into account when answering this question. Unlike other open labs, UAB Open Labs are located inside a university campus; not in a neighbourhood nor in any other “real life” setting, so the community at stake was very specific and of high educational level.  Nonetheless, UAB Open Labs are not located inside the academic traditional closed labs scheme and proposed to go beyond that. These characteristics make UAB Open Labs a particular case situated in between universities and cities. In other words, UAB Open Labs are bringing academic labs and open labs together; establishing a new mixed space between them and defining a new way of doing things in an academic setting. This peculiarity determined which actors could get involved in its design process. In any open lab the Quadruple Helix principle establishes that companies, public administration, academia and citizens should be brought together to seek solutions for the urban challenges that concern them. Nevertheless, UAB Open Labs set up a quite more complex scenario, where any stakeholder linked to the university can become a possible user, as well as anyone outside university borders.

Therefore, the whole university community together with near local and regional administrations, citizens and other universities were called to participate in the design process; enabling multiple and diverse actors (students, professors, researchers, librarians, neighbours, etc.) to work together. After this wide call, at the end of the design process, approximately 137 people were involved,most of them from the UAB community but also relevant external participants. As the attendance data shows, the entangled map of stakeholders was a challenge itself, adding complexity to the process, but at the same time presented a great opportunity to work with and for the special diversity and talent present within the campus community.

Co-creation and collaborative methodologies

As was exposed in previous paragraphs, in line with Open Lab’s approach and aims, the design process was based on participative methodologies. It was conducted throughout three different stages, which had different aims and targets.

  • The first stage (January – March 2018) consisted of three co-design sessions, where the whole net of stakeholders where invited to participate. Each workshop had a concept that guided the objectives and participative techniques: “sympathy”, “inspiration” and “prototyping”. That is, during these workshops, stakeholders shared their interests and get to know each other. Moreover, the workshops allowed to collect suggestions to define the functions, aims, governance and spaces of the labs. Additionally, during this phase specialized visits to relevant Labs in the territory were realised with the academic community.
  • After these workshops, in the subsequent phase (May – December 2018) two commissions / working – action groups were created in order to bring the ideas and suggestions collected to reality. These commissions aimed to define clearly the characteristics of the future labs and advance with operational steps to make them reality. The First Commission worked on the regulations, governance, community and virtual platform; and the Second Commission oversaw the infrastructures, tools and machines, spaces and furniture. Both Commissions met periodically to plan and draw all the labs characteristics. Although the call was also open to the whole community, the Commissions were formed by stakeholders more closely related with the UAB Open Labs organization. The loss of participation during a co-design long process is one of the main challenges that this kind of experiences must face. Even so, it should be noted that a massive participation may hinder the decision-making process.
  • Finally, once the design was almost closed, two last co-creation meetings were celebrated to draw the physic composition of the labs (furniture, lights and other features). Both meetings took place in the space where the labs will be located, which facilitated the ideation exercise. In this case, the attendants were almost entirely from the university community.

Towards a conceptualization of the UAB Open Labs model

One of the singularities of the UAB Open Labs is precisely the starting point that we have just described: to a large extent, these Labs have been configured as a result of a participatory process of co-creation that was opened to the entire university community and which also involved other agents of the territory, both public and private. So, these labs, which are open spaces for co-design and co-creation, have been themselves co-designed and co-created; it is, itself, a singularity.

To what extent the future practices performed at the UAB Open Labs will be influenced by this singularity, or how the governance of the Labs will be impacted by the transversality and horizontality with which, from the beginning, the Labs were conceptualized, are just some of the many questions that still remain to be answered.

In fact, the first two physical spaces of the UAB Open Labs (Design Lab and Digital Lab) were inaugurated in November 2019 but the Lab model in itself is supposed to remain open, to accommodate non-traditional or singular ideas of value that could be incorporated. However, it is possible to identify two more characteristics that, together with the singularity mentioned earlier, are drawing a singular model of an Open Lab which will be more clearly defined during the functioning of the Labs from now on:

  • The first characteristic is that the UAB Open Labs have re-appropriated some conceptualizations that initially came from makerspaces and other manufacturing / tech community spaces. The Labs are conceptualized as open spaces for testing and prototyping, where innovation is fostered through co-creation and co-design practices which turn around the “ideas” and the “doing”. And, more specifically, “Doing-It-With-Others” (DIWO), since the starting point is that the potential of “making” is amplified when people meet with other people in spaces provided with helpful technologies to materialize projects but, above all, where people meet other people to collaborate, design and create together. Thus, on one hand, these spaces promote innovation based on co-creation and co-design practices (Anderson, 2012). And on the other hand, these practices turn around the concept of “doing”: manipulating, testing, experimenting and prototyping. In this sense, the prototype forms the base of the maker culture, as it is “doing” and “manipulating” how different attempts are given to answer the questions that people ask themselves (Corsín, 2014). The construction of significance around the object, then, goes beyond its consideration as a simple “good” or “product” (Dougherty, 2012), since the object´s creation process in itself has agency and value.
  • The second characteristic is that, conceptually, the UAB Open Labs model falls close to the description that Lhoste and Barbier (2016) placed on FabLabs when they analyzed them from the point of view of Oldenburg’s “third spaces” (1997): “a singular form of collective and distributed open innovation“, a new form of social organization in which the socio-technical practices performed are related to cooperation, collaborative generation of knowledge and collective innovation. As in the Labs studied by these authors, the UAB Open Labs accordingly try to generate symbolic open spaces that favor sociability, sharing and collaboration. For that reason, the physical locations of the LABs were chosen based on criteria such as visibility, proximity to flows and accessibility.  

Contributions of the model

As it was mentioned in the beginning, the point of departure for the UAB Open Labs was the thematic research communities (COREs) that had already been articulated within the university community and the context of the Smart Campus Living Lab.  While the thematic communities (COREs) ensured that a wide co-designand a co-creation participatory process could take place ,the Smart Campus Living Lab provided the base requirements and an operative frame for the Open Labs, as well as a testbed for the produced solutions. And, as we also stated, there is a clear transition from DIY (Do-It-Yourself) to DIWO (Do-It-With-Others) in the configuration and launching of the UAB Open Labs. Perhaps, as could be understood from the text of Lhoste and Barbier, one of the contributions of Open Labs to innovation could be found just in these two aspects: i) how the Lab has been put in place and  ii) how these conditions related to participation, collaboration and collective encounter, have been maintained. If so, the conceptual model of UAB Open Labs could notably contribute to achieve new comprehension of how Open Labs could contribute to social innovation and related processes, especially with relation to academic environments and communities.


Article written in collaboration with the research group Barcelona Science and Technology Studies Group (STS-b)

WEB

Open Labs

https://www.uab.cat/open-labs/

Barcelona Science and Technology Studies Group

https://barcelonasts.wordpress.com/

REFERENCES

Anderson, C. (2012). Makers: The New Industrial Revolution. London: Random House Business Books.

Corsín (2014). Introduction: The prototype: more than many and less than one. Journal of Cultural Economy 7 (4), 381-398

Dougherty, D. (2012). The maker movement. Innovations, 7(3), 11–14.


Lhoste, É. & Barbier, M. (2016). FabLabs: L’institutionnalisation de Tiers-Lieux du « soft hacking ». Revue d’anthropologie des connaissances, vol. 10, 1(1), 43-69.

Oldenburg, R. (1997). The great good place: cafés, coffee shops, community centers, beauty parlors, general stores, bars, hangouts, and how they get you through the day. New York, Marlowe & Company.

In this blog article, Konstantinos Kourkoutas, Coordinator of the CORE Smart and Sustainable Cities of the UAB and Angela Serrano, Head of the Unit of Strategic Development at UAB discuss how the critical mass of research and innovation institutions at the Autonomous University of Barcelona facilitated the emergence of a number of Strategic Research Networks (COREs), including Smart and Sustainable Cities. The research on the Smart and Sustainable Cities aims to integrate the knowledge generated by disciplines involved in traditional spatial research and planning with new disruptive technologies and methodologies.

The Strategic Research Networks / CORES (Comunitat Adreçada a Repte Estratègic, in Catalan) are interdisciplinary research communities, with a flexible organization   that bring together all the research groups of the different members of the UAB Sphere, in line with the objectives of the challenges outlined in the priority societal challenges of Horizon 2020, the RISCAT, and the local strategic development goals.

The CORE mission is to promote the R & D & I capabilities of the UAB and its Sphere through the support of the coordinated development of research and transfer strategies, with the ultimate goal of increasing the competitiveness of the member groups, both individually and collectively. Their aim is to generate and promote networking, to share resources and to coordinate actions required to effectively boost projects that may advance knowledge in the field and promote transfer of result into society and industry. Each CORE has a Strategic Plan and a community manager.

A Snapshot into the development of Catalonia Regional Innovation Ecosystem

The current challenge for European public universities is to ensure that research excellence translates into an economic, social and cultural growth for the region and that the public research can be accountable not only to the wide scientific world but also to the society and the respective challenges being faced.

The Regional Smart Specialization Strategies set up in 2010 by the European Commission identify priorities in which each region believe it has potential to grow and were set up by the interaction of the quadruple helix (government, industry, academia and society). Universities are key actors in defining and implementing such strategies, thus they had to make an effort to draft strategic plans that enable alignment with these policies. By taking part to the Regional Specialization Strategy (RIS3CAT in Catalonia), the Catalan universities have developed, for the first time, a strategic vision of the region and its key sectors and met new partners and stakeholders in order to be able to participate in the regional strategy programs.

The strength of the UAB proposal comes, not only from its own capabilities, but from the singularity of the UAB Research Hub – the UAB Sphere- in terms of critical mass. The UAB Sphere is an ecosystem of knowledge that aggregates research and innovation institutions contribute to socio-economic development of the territory. Aggregation in terms of increase of critical mass, sharing of resources, synergies, optimizing investments, and improving the sustainability of the system, results in an improved competitiveness of the territory. This definition has played an important role in the development project “Excellence Campus UAB.”

The award of the Campus of International Excellence (CIE) to the UAB by the Spanish Ministry of Science back in 2009, set out the ground for the development of the current RIS3. The UAB-CIE jointly focused on the creation of a regional plan to consolidate the centers on the UAB campus with the technology parks, companies and local municipalities. They aimed to create a vibrant regional hub of knowledge and innovation with a special emphasis on specific areas of specialization that could act as motors for local socio-economic development. The project implied, for the first time strengthening the collaboration among all the research and innovation stakeholders of the campus and the territory, and it represented a major shift in the vision of the university as an integrating and fundamental part of any regional strategy. This undoubtedly made it easier for the UAB to fit its future activities into the Regional Strategy for Intelligent Specialization of Catalonia 2014-2020 (RISCAT) since it coincided with actions that were driven by the spirit of integrating strategies and aggregating the capacities that had emerged from the UAB-CEI project.

It was already demonstrated that the set of institutions that make up the Sphere UAB-CEI had the necessary capabilities, both human and material, to develop successful projects in complex and strategic areas. Also, under the RISCAT instrument called Communities, the creation of thematic partnerships was proposed in order to meet the regional socio-economic demands and challenges in specific sectors. For the UAB in order to respond to these challenges and effectively articulate its own capacities, the Strategic Research Communities (CORE) were launched starting in 2013. The CORE networks were established based on a strategic challenge identified at international, European and territorial level and in which the UAB-CEI had a sufficient critical mass of research groups that covered the entire chain of value of each area. In this sense, the UAB has defined four COREs so far: Smart & Sustainable Cities, Cultural Heritage, Mental Health and Education & Occupability that act in the quadruple helix frame of territorial organization: academic field, productive sector, government sector and civil society.

Smart and Sustainable Cities within the CORE

One of the four COREs created is the one on Smart and Sustainable Cities. The territorial dimension of the City thematic allows for a strong interaction between groups of the network and regional stakeholders and the generation of knowledge and new initiatives / mechanisms that can contribute to the sustainable development of cities in the surrounding territory. In scientific terms, the aim was to integrate the knowledge generated by disciplines involved in traditional spatial research and planning with new disruptive technologies and methodologies that have emerged or are emerging and are changing both the organizational as well as physical aspect of our cities. During the three years in function now, natural sub-thematic groups were formed around topics, such as circular economy and city metabolism, digital governance and technological sovereignty, new models of productions and consumption in the city, connected vehicles and advanced mobility, spatial data and decision making models,  Societal Perception of Technology among others, creating over time a proper structure and self-organization. Another important part of the CORE activity was the articulation and interaction with the local quadriple-helix stakeholders, and the initiation of new projects, such as the UAB OPEN LABS project, which will be described in a subsequent article.

The COREs initiative has provoked the curiosity and interest of many Spanish and European universities that have come contacted us over the years to know more on how they can replicate the model. Thus, we think it is worthwhile to be included and mentioned within the UCITY project, so more people get inspired and start organizing and collaborating around strategic challenges in their territories.

Info COREs

https://www.uab.cat/web/research/cores-uab/uab-strategic-research-communities-cores-1345698259237.html

CORE Smart & Sustainable Cities

https://www.uab.cat/core-ciutats/